Tel: 02920 388081

  Fax: 02920 388832

Diabetes

Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as early as possible because it will get progressively worse if left untreated. You should therefore visit your GP if you have symptoms, such as feeling thirsty, passing urine more often than usual and feeling tired all the time.

 

What causes diabetes

The amount of sugar in the blood is controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is produced by the pancreas (a gland behind the stomach).

When food is digested and enters your bloodstream, insulin moves glucose out of the blood and into cells, where it's broken down to produce energy. If you have diabetes, your body is unable to break down glucose into energy. This is because there's either not enough insulin to move the glucose, or the insulin produced doesn't work properly.

 

  • Type 1 diabetes

In type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin. As no insulin is produced, your glucose levels increase, which can seriously damage the body's organs.

Type 1 diabetes is often known as insulin-dependent diabetes. It's also sometimes known as juvenile diabetes or early-onset diabetes because it usually develops before the age of 40, often during the teenage years.

Type 1 diabetes is less common than type 2 diabetes. In the UK, it affects about 10% of all adults with diabetes.

If you're diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, you'll need insulin injections for the rest of your life. You'll also need to pay close attention to certain aspects of your lifestyle and health to ensure your blood glucose levels stay balanced.

 

  • Type 2 diabetes

 

Type 2 diabetes is where the body doesn't produce enough insulin or the body's cells don't react to insulin. This is known as insulin resistance.

Type 2 diabetes is far more common than type 1 diabetes. In the UK, around 90% of all adults with diabetes have type 2 diabetes.

If you're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you may be able to control your symptoms simply by eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly and monitoring your blood glucose levels.

However, as type 2 diabetes is a progressive condition, you may eventually need medication, usually in the form of tablets.

 

All people with diabetes should undergo a diabetes care review at least once annually. Your diabetic review will allow your doctors to monitor your health.

 

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Practice News

148 Clare Road

Grangetown

Cardiff

CF3 4BH

 

TEL: 02920 388081

FAX: 02920 388832

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Monday - Friday         8.00-18.30

 

Saturday & Sunday         Closed

 

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